ASKĪ, KĪSIK, NIPĪ, ININIWAK, ĒKWA KĀ ATI KWĒSKĪHIKIHK
February 12 & 13, 2020   |   Thompson Regional Community Centre   |  274 Thompson Dr. S   |  Thompson, MB
 
REGISTER NOW

please join us

Hosted by the University College of the North, the Land, Air, Water, People and Climate Change Conference will by held February 12 & 13, 2020 at the Thompson Regional Community Centre in Thompson, Manitoba. 

Over the two days, registrants will engage in conversations that will broaden their sense of responsibility on their learning about climate change as a community member.  Presentations will encourage critical thinking about climate change and the way we teach it and the way we learn.  

COMPLETE YOUR REGISTRATION

Who should attend?

Community members
Community organizations
Business community
Secondary and post-secondary students
Teachers, instructors, faculty, administrators
UCN staff and students

HOW TO GET THERE

Join us at the Thompson Regional Community Centre  (274 Thompson Dr. S) in Thompson, Manitoba.

WHERE TO STAY

Group accommodations have been set up at the following hotels for UCN TRC attendees. Attendees are responsible to book their own accommodations.

Best Western Thompson Hotel & Suites
205 Mystery Lake Road, Thompson, MB, R8N 1Z8 | 204-778-8887
Group Code: UCN Environmental
Booking Deadline: January 11, 2020

Days Inn & Suites By Wyndham
21 Thompson Drive, Thompson, MB, R8N 2B5 | 204-778-6000
Group Code: Coming soon

PROGRAM


DAY ONE: FEBRUARY 12, 2020

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM
REGISTRATION
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM
PIPE CEREMONY

DETAILS

Location: UCN Ceremonial Room
Elder Marie Ballantyne

9:00 AM – 9:30 AM
OPENING PRAYERS & REMARKS

DETAILS

Emcee Welcome:
David Williamson

Opening Drum Group:
RD Parker Drum Group

Opening Prayer:
Jimmy Hunter-Spence

Dignitary Remarks:
Julyda Lagimodiere, Vice President, Manitoba Metis Federation
Mayor Colleen Smook, City of Thompson
Doug Lauvstad, President & Vice Chancellor, University College of the North
Colin Russell, Chair, Inter-Universities Advisory Committee, University College of the North

Acknowledgement of Logo Winner:
April Saulier

HIDE DETAILS

9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
KEYNOTE

DETAILS

Speaker:
Angaangaq Angakkorsuaq (click for biography)

“You cannot stop the melting of the ice, it is too late. It does not matter if you believe it or not, it is too late. It is time to find someone to be the Hope for mankind. The new world needs people who understand the beauty of the Spirit of the humans. You and I need to change. I hope and pray one of you will become the Hope for mankind. You and I are the citizens of this land. We are the caretakers and the custodians of this land. Find the strength and capacity within yourself to make you the Hope for mankind. Only by Melting the Ice in the Heart of Man will man have a chance to change and begin using his knowledge wisely.”
– Angaangaq

HIDE DETAILS

10:45 AM – 11:00 AM
HEALTH BREAK
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
SESSION #1 – RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS

DETAILS

Speakers:

  • Bringing Enviromental Studies to Life Through the Manitoba Environthon Program – Jacqueline Monteith, Science Instructional Coach, Frontier School Division
  • Changing Climates: Moved Toward Post Secondary Education in the North – Christa Dubesky, Science Instructor, University College of the North
  • Climate Change and Noise Pollution – Keyanna Boyko-Ouellette, Student, University College of the North
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
LUNCH

DETAILS

Entertainment by Ken Bighetty

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
SESSION #2 – COUNCIL OF ELDERS PANEL ON CONFERENCE THEMES
2:00 PM – 2:30 PM
HEALTH BREAK
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
SESSION #3 – BUILDING SUSTAINABLE HOMES AND BUILDING CAPACITY ON FIRST NATION RESERVES

DETAILS

Speakers:
Dr. Shirley Thompson, Associate Professor, Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba (click for biography)
Marleny Bonnycastle, Associate Professor, Social Work, University of Manitoba (click for biography)
Mino Bimaadiziwin Homebuilder Students, Wasagamack and Garden Hill First Nation (click for biography)

Session Information: 
Postsecondary education that builds students capacity and culturally appropriate homes can solve the housing crisis on reserves. The Mino Bimaadiziwin partnership is funding 15 local students in both Wasagamack and Garden Hill First Nations to design and build homes, learning from a team of builders, architects and engineers. Homes are being built in each community with local wood, wood stoves and traditional knowledge and will be completed in Spring 2020. As well, Idle No More has designed and built homes with and for First Nations with local wood including a “muskrat house” to provide sustainable utilities (energy for cooking, bathing, water, and treating wastewater) when on the land. To scale these programs up and out requires that the same public post-secondary education funding programs off-reserve be available on reserve. The current fee-for-service post-secondary education funding model applied to reserves results in 5 to 10 x the price, creating barriers to community development and to educational attainment.

HIDE DETAILS

3:30 PM
DAILY ONE WRAP UP

DETAILS

Emcee: David Williamson
Elder Marie Ballantyne



DAY TWO: FEBRUARY 13, 2020

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM
PIPE CEREMONY

DETAILS

Location: UCN Ceremonial Room
Elder Marie Ballantyne

8:15 AM – 8:45 AM
UCN THOMPSON CAMPUS TOUR
9:00 AM – 9:30 AM
OPENING PRAYERS & REMARKS

DETAILS

Opening Drumming Group:
RD Parker Drum Group

Opening Prayer:
Elder Jimmy Hunter-Spence

Recap of Day One:
Emcee David Williamson

HIDE DETAILS

9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
KEYNOTE

DETAILS

Speaker:
Katherine Morrisseau-Sinclair (click for biography)

Speaker Information:
Focusing her energies on the important responsibilities she has a Midewauniquay, and the role women have to care for the water, Katherine is dedicated to protecting the spirits of water.

“Water equals life and we’ve got to start protecting our waterways from the corporations that continue to pollute her, the industries that continue to rob the water and bottle and sell it. I need my grandchildren seven generations from now to have clean water to drink.”

HIDE DETAILS

10:30 AM – 10:45 AM
HEALTH BREAK
10:45 AM – 11:45 AM
SESSION #4 – FISHERIES AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

DETAILS

Speaker:
Christopher Clarke, President, Resource Management – Norway House Fisherman’s Co-Op Ltd.
Russell Budd, Co-Manager, Resource Management – Norway House Fisherman’s Co-Op Ltd. (click for biography)
Crystal Crate, Co-Manager, Resource Management – Norway House Fisherman’s Co-Op Ltd.(click for biography)

Session Information: 
This session is designed to allow attendees to understand the direction and goals fisherman are striving for on a daily basis in terms of environmental factors through a history of the Fisherman’s Co-Op. With the future in mind, potential careers that may be available in the future are highlighted.

HIDE DETAILS

11:45 AM – 12:45 PM
LUNCH

DETAILS

Entertainment by Star Beardy

12:45 PM – 1:45 PM
SESSION #5 – CULTURAL REVITALIZATION AS A TOOL TO FIGHT CLIMATE CHANGE

DETAILS

Speaker:
Becky Cook (click for biography)

Session Information:
In 2019 Misipawistik Cree Nation Health Authority developed a climate change action plan. The plan includes 6 goals to help the communities of Misipawistik Cree Nation and Grand Rapids adapt to and mitigate changes in the local environment resulting from climate change and other factors. Various actions are outlined to achieve each goal, for 5 of the 6 goals these actions include ways to help community members re-connect with their land and culture. The talk will give an overview of MCN’s Climate Change Report and Action Plan focusing on ways cultural revitalization initiatives help community members adapt to and mitigate the effects of climate change.

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1:45 PM – 2:45 PM
SESSION #6 – KIKAWINAW

DETAILS

Speaker:
Ron Cook (click for biography)

Session Information: 
In ininimowin, we find the history, the teachings, and the worldview of the inino imbedded in the words. As an oral language, this ensures the continuation of the culture from one generation to the next. The Elders tell us that we cannot just translate our language into English; we have to look more closely in order to understand our ininīwin. In this session, we will examine concepts of land and the natural world based on words in ininīmowin; concepts that give us an insight into our understanding of the world we live in.

HIDE DETAILS

2:45 PM – 3:00 PM
CLOSING REMARKS

DETAILS

Emcee: David Williamson
Closing Drum Group: RD Parker Drum Group
Elder Marie Ballantyne


DOWNLOAD PDF PROGRAM

MENU

AM Health Breaks (both)

Bannock, muffins & preserves
Seasonal fruit
Yogurt

Wednesday 12th Lunch

Pickerel, wild rice, salad, veggies, bannock and dessert

Wednesday 12th PM Break

Cheese & cracker platter

Thursday 13th Lunch

Beef stew (vegetarian stew) with bannock and dessert


BIOGRAPHIES


Shaman, Traditional Healer and Carrier of the Qilaut

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Angaangaq Angakkorsuaq is a Shaman, traditional Healer and Carrier of the Qilaut (wind drum) He’s an Inuit-Kalaallit Elder whose family belongs to the traditional healers of the Far North, a peaceful culture, thousands of years old, the only country in the world where Man lives and there has never been war: Kalaallit Nunaat, Greenland.

His name means ‘The Man Who Looks Like His Uncle’. Since a ceremony in Greenland in 2009 where the “sacred fire” was brought back to Greenland, he has carried the title “Angakkorsuaq” – “Great Shaman”.

His engagement for the environment and indigenous issues has brought him to over 70 countries in the world. Angaangaq is a keynote speaker at international conferences on Climate Change, Environmental and Indigenous Issues. He has represented the Arctic peoples in the United Nations General Assembly, and frequently speaks before governments, at universities, forums and summits.

Angaangaq’s teachings are deeply rooted in the wisdom and oral tradition of his people and summon us to bridge the distance from our minds to our hearts through strength and gentleness; through compassion and love; through courage and grace, bringing about personal transformation and global healing for the times to come.

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Co-Manager, Resource Management Technical Department, Norway House Fisherman’s Co-Op

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Russell Budd has been Co-Manager of the Resource Management Technical Department for the Norway House Fisherman’s Co-op since 2018. Prior to that, Russell spent 10 years as an electrical foreman for RJR Electric, serving all of Northern Manitoba.

Functions as a Co-Manager of the Resource Management Technical Department include handling and working through the logistics of the program and the day to day operations during the study as well as leading up to the study season. Russell looks forward to sharing the work of RMTD.

Russell has been married for 10 years and has three daughters.

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Curriculum Consultant for the Centre for Aboriginal Language and Culture at the University College of the North

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Ron Cook was a fisherman on Lake Winnipeg and lived a traditional lifestyle with his wife and five daughters. In 1992, his interest in his first language (ininimowin) inspired him to enter BUNTEP when they offered a B. Ed program for Native Language teachers, graduating in 1997 with greatest distinction. He is currently the curriculum consultant for the Centre for Aboriginal Language and Culture at the University College of the North.

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Co-Manager, Resource Management Technical Department, Norway House Fisherman’s Co-Op

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Crystal Crate is one of the two selected to co-manage and be a part of the Resource Management Technical Department (RMTD) program. Crystal has been in this position for 2 years now. The RMTD program is definitely a huge asset to the Fisherman’s Coop & Community and opens doors to our future younger generation.

Crystal is a granddaughter, daughter, niece, sister, cousin, and friend to family who are commercial fisherman. She is proud of this, but recently has become very passionate about this, as it has shown her how hard commercial fishing really is and how it is so important to our local fisherman’s lively hood – for many it is their only income.

The RMTD program has opened many doors to opportunities for us to learn about our lakes – that, she is so grateful for.

HIDE BIOGRAPHY

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Becky was raised on the lands and waters surrounding Misipawistik and Lake Winnipeg. Her family spent time in the summer and fall camping and fishing, fostering her love for the land at a young age. She also learned the importance of balance and respect for the all of creation through participation in ceremonies and culture camps.

She received her B.Sc. in Geology and Geophysics from the University of Manitoba in 2006, and her Ph. D. in Marine Geophysics from the University of Southampton in 2015. Since receiving her Ph.D. she was worked on various projects in northern Manitoba. She currently is committed to her traditional education and works with Elders and knowledge holders in her home community of Misipawistik to offer land-based teachings to youth through the Misipawistik Pimatisimēskanaw program.

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Associate Professor at the Natural Resources Institute at the University of Manitoba

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Marleny Bonnycastle is an Associate professor of Social Work at the University of Manitoba and a co-applicant of the Mino Bimaadiziwin partnership and a researcher on homelessness.

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From Wasagamack and Garden Hill First Nation

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Mino Bimaadiziwin Homebuilder students from Wasagamack and Garden Hill First Nation will also present and discuss their learning and many accomplishments with University of Manitoba students- Jide Oni and James Queskekapow.

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Bear Clan and 4th degree Midewiwin

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Katherine Morrisseau-Sinclair (Animikiikwe) is Bear Clan and 4th degree Midewiwin from the Three Fires Midewiwin Lodge. She was born and raised in Crane River, Manitoba and has lived in Winnipeg for most of her adult life. Her mother, Laverne Morrisseau, taught her the importance of family, community and independence as she was brought up alongside her many brothers and sisters in Crane River. She is the proud mother of 5 children, 5 grandchildren, and innumerable nieces and nephews across turtle island.

Katherine retired in 2009 after a successful career spanning more than 30 years developing Indigenous human resources strategies in a variety of sectors, delivering Indigenous awareness seminars, program management, and adult education and training. Since her retirement, she has focused her energies on the important responsibilities she has a Midewauniquay, and the role women have to care for the water. When Lake Winnipeg was declared the most threatened lake in the world in 2013, she jumped to action and organized a ceremonial water walk that lasted for 28 days and more than 1,000 km to pray for the health of the lake, and the health of our people.

Today Katherine remains committed to her role as an auntie and grandmother to the many young people who look up to her.

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Associate Professor at the Natural Resources Institute at the University of Manitoba

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Shirley Thompson is an associate professor at the Natural Resources Institute at the University of Manitoba. She is the principal investigator of participatory research on community-led education on housing with the Mino Bimaadiziwin partnership. Please see more about the partnership at http://ecohealthcircle.com.

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FULL BIOGRAPHY

Mabel Bignell was born in The Pas on August 8, 1945 and attended school in The Pas until the eighth grade. Following the loss of her Mother in 1960 she, along with her sister and brother, moved to Dauphin Residential School where she finished most of her Grade 12. Mabel then returned home to The Pas and married Moses Bignell from OCN. They were blessed with five sons and their family has grown to include five grandsons and two granddaughters.

Later, Mabel decided to return to school and went to Brandon University and received her Bachelor of Education. She has been a teacher since teaching Kindergarten and Grade 4 for five years. From 1984 to 2002 she taught the Cree language locally and has also taught Cree language courses at UCN for the Restorative Justice & Conflict Resolution program as an evening course. Mabel has also been a member of different language committees both locally and provincially.

Mabel enjoyed working as a curriculum developer for Cree language and also as a teacher of the Cree language. She is still working with the school and teachers in language whenever she is needed despite retiring in June 2002.

HIDE BIOGRAPHY

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Martha Jonasson was born and raised in Wabowden, MB. She is a widow with 1 daughter, 4 sons, 15 grandchildren, and 8 great grandchildren. Martha is the second oldest of 13 surviving siblings.

Martha returned to school as an adult, completed Grade 12. She graduated from a 2-year New Careers Health Training program and completed University of Manitoba Psychology course by correspondence and periodic trips to Winnipeg. She also took counseling modules during her employment with the Federal Government.

While employed with the Federal and Provincial governments, Martha was responsible for providing employment counselling services to the following communities: Norway House, Nelson House, Cross Lake, Gillam, Churchill, Ilford, Pikwitoni, Thicket Portage, South Indian Lake, God’s Lake Narrows, God’s River, Oxford House, and Island Lake.

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Grand Rapids

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Stella Neff is a Cree Elder from the Misipawistik Cree Nation, Grand Rapids, MB. Stella was born (May 19, 1944) and raised in Grand Rapids. She has had two careers, one as a practical nurse at Winnipeg General Hospital and the Manitoba Rehabilitation Hospital. She attended Brandon University where she received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology and a Bachelor of Education in Educational Administration. Stella received a Principal’s Certificate from the Department of Education.

Stella is currently retired having worked in many areas of education that included English Language Enrichment Consultant (Swan Valley School Division), Principal, Cree Language Coordinator, and classroom teacher at most levels (Easterville). Stella also worked at the Brandon University as Student Coordinator for the PENT program. She has served on many committees and boards including the Swan River Indian and Métis Friendship Center, Association for Community Living, Chair of the Fetal Alcohol/Fetal Effects Steering Committee, Parkland Mental Health Council, and the Manitoba Teacher’s Society for Equality in Education. Currently, Stella is a member of the Premier’s Advisory Council on Poverty, Education, and Citizenship. Stella is also the current Chair for the UCN Council of Elders. She continues to work at Grand Rapids as an Elder Advisor.

HIDE BIOGRAPHY

CONTACT

Phone

Kelly Forgala
204-391-4419

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